Saturday, September 6, 2014

How the Bible Defines Sin

 
 
 
Taken from
"Holiness: It's Nature, Hindrances, Difficulties, & Roots"
by J. C. Ryle
 
 
He that wishes to attain right views about Christian holiness must begin by examining the vast and solemn subject of sin.  He must dig down very low if he would build high.  A mistake here is most mischievous.  Wrong views about holiness are generally traceable to wrong views about human corruption.  ...
 
 
The plain truth is that a right knowledge of sin lies at the root of all saving Christianity.  Without it such doctrines as justification, conversion, sanctification, are "words and names" (Acts 18: 15) which convey no meaning to the mind.  The first thing, therefore, that God does when He makes any one a new creature in Christ is to send light into his heart, and show him that he is a guilty sinner.  The material creation in Genesis began with "light," (Genesis 1: 3) and so also does the spiritual creation.  God "shines into our hearts" by the work of the Holy Ghost, and then spiritual life begins (Second Corinthians 4: 6).  Dim or indistinct views of sin are the origin of most of the errors, heresies, and false doctrines of the present day.  If a man does not realize the dangerous nature of his soul's disease, you cannot wonder if he is content with false or imperfect remedies.  ...
 
 
I shall begin the subject by supplying some DEFINITION of sin.  We are all of course familiar with the terms "sin" and "sinners."  We talk frequently of "sin" being in the world, and of men committing "sins."  But what do we mean by these terms and phrases?  Do we really know?  ...
 
 
Sin, in short, is that vast moral disease which affects the whole human race, of every rank, and class, and name, and nation, and people, and tongue; a disease from which there never was but one born of woman that was free.  Need I say that One was Christ Jesus the Lord?
 
 
I say, furthermore, that "a sin," to speak more particularly, consists in doing, saying, thinking, or imagining anything that is not in perfect conformity with the mind and law of God.  "Sin," in short, as the Scripture saith, is "the transgression of the law" (First John 3: 4).  The slightest outward or inward departure from absolute mathematical parallelism with God's revealed will and character constitutes a sin, and at once makes us guilty in God's sight.

0 comments:

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...